• 19-02-2017

    CKNW Health Series with Dr. Allana Polo

    CKNW is celebrating wellness with a health series and they've turned to Dr. Allana Polo for help and advice. 

    You can listen to each interview on CKNW. Here is an overview of Dr. Allana's appearances.

    The Power of Turmeric

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    Excerpt:

    “Turmeric is the new buzzword food,” explains Dr. Polo, who says you can get it both in powder form for cooking or as a capsule as a supplement.

    The substance is derived from a plant in the ginger family.

    “The active ingredient that we’re also concerned about – or really interested in – is actually curcumin. It’s the main active ingredient which holds the most inflammatory and anti-oxidant potential. The beautiful thing about turmeric is that in all the recent studies and journalism [and] medical information that we have, it’s really effective against inflammatory conditions, like arthritis.”

    Polo says research shows it can actually match the effects of some specifically anti-inflammatory medications people are taking.

    Nutrients for Brain Health

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    Excerpt:

    Another, she says, are Omega 3s.

    “Which are fatty acids like salmon or fish oil capsules. The beautiful thing is your brain is 60 per cent fat. By incorporating good fat into your body, you’re just helping the neuronal connection and communication within the brain.”

    Another good option are antioxidants, says Dr. Polo.

    “You can take antioxidants through a capsule, or you can do it through food: dark, rich, colourful fruits and vegetables. Antioxidants are really important because your brain requires oxygen to function, and if you have a lot of free-radical damage, or if there’s a lot of oxidative stress in the brain, then these antioxidants are really helpful for brain function.”

    Fruits like blueberries and strawberries and vegetables like spinach and broccoli are all rich in antioxidants.

    Beyond simply boosting your brain function, Dr. Polo says nutrients like Omega 3s and antioxidants can have both preventative and restorative effects on your grey matter.

    Reduce Your Meat Intake

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    Excerpt:

    People say one of the best ways to improve your overall health is to reduce the amount of meat that you eat. For a lot of people, that is difficult. But is that even true? Do we eat too much meat?

    Dr. Polo says the short answer is… not necessarily.

    “It’s not that we’re necessarily eating too much meat; it’s the quality of meat that we’re eating. So it’s too much red meat that we’re eating. It’s saturated fat, and it’s also now pumped full of hormones and chemicals, and growth factors that we weren’t eating years ago. So I think the quality of the meat has changed, and I do think the studies that are coming out are showing the importance of a plant-based diet for longevity and health and heart disease and obesity…high cholesterol and diabetes,” she says.

    What are superfoods?

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    Excerpt:

    “Society is becoming so much more mindful about what the nutrition of food is, what we’re putting into our body, and how helpful that is. I think last year it was kale; kale was on the map for a while. And then it was chard, then cauliflower, goji berries, acai berries… basically these are all fresh, colourful vibrant fruits and vegetables. They’re rich in antioxidants..."

    Incorporating Healthy Oils into Your Diet

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    Excerpt:

    “There are some oils that are saturated, so we don’t want to use that,” says Dr. Polo.

    But while you stay away from those, she says there are a group of healthy, unsaturated oils that are both delicious and good for you.

    “The really great ones to incorporate into your diet, because they’re a lot higher in Omega 3s and Omega 9s – which are anti-inflammatory – are avocado oil, flax seed, macadamia nut, olive and coconut oil,” Dr. Polo says.

    • 31-01-2017

    Slow Down - Chew - Enjoy Life!

    I had an “aha” moment last night while eating my dinner. I caught myself with too much food in my mouth at one time, and realized that I needed to slow down and chew my food more thoroughly.

    This is a microcosm of my life lately. Last fall, after a particularly busy few months, my body started to give me signals that I needed to slow down my pace of life. Thankfully, I have listened to my body – I took a week off, and have upped my self-care with walks, relaxation, baths, reading, meditation, and eating slowly.

    And, very importantly, I am making sure to incorporate these self-care gems into my everyday life.

    Back to chewing. Chewing our food is very under-rated in our society. Life seems to be about moving fast - rushing to and from work/activities, fast food, eating breakfast on-the- run, lunch at the desk, etc.

    With such busyness in life going on, it seems like there is no time to eat. Well guess what? These priorities are screwed up!

    Eating is the sustenance of life, and deserves to have a place of high priority with mealtimes carved out as part of our day. As a colon hydrotherapist, I constantly get to see, through the view tube in the equipment, what comes out of the other end of the digestive tract.

    And, just like your dentist knows if you have been flossing or not, I know if you have been chewing your food thoroughly or not! I have to say that I see a lot of undigested food, or rather ‘unchewed food’, sometimes very identifiable like mushrooms, nuts, seeds, red pepper.

    I so often find myself talking to clients about their chewing habits. It is amazing how people pay attention when they see for themselves their own unchewed food being eliminated!

    Problems arising from not chewing thoroughly include:

    - improper digestion from eating too fast and not calmly;

    - lack of digestive enzymes from the saliva because food is not staying in the mouth long enough;

    - not getting the nutrients from these pieces of food that are not breaking down;

    - undigested food in the GI tract can lead to a condition called ‘leaky gut’ which can also contribute to allergies;

    - the ileocecal valve between the small and large intestine is forced to stay open wider to allow these foods through which can lead to intestinal problems.

    We CAN slow down our chewing, and we do this by retraining ourselves.

    Here are the chewing tips that I have taught to thousands of people:

    1. Look at the size of the bite of food that you are about to put into your mouth. It should be approximately 1- inch in diameter, no bigger than a loonie. If you put in a huge mass of food, there is no way that you can chew it all thoroughly!

    2. Put your fork down between each bite, and do not pick it up again until we have swallowed this bite. Simple but not easy! We are so busy getting our fork ready with the next bite and drooling over how good it is going to be. Think about it though – we are so NOT in the moment, we are actually trying to be in the next moment by anticipating it. Putting our fork down forces us to pay attention to what is in our mouth right now, the texture, how much it is chewed. Believe me, by staying mindfully in the present moment, you will even taste the food more! That is a fabulous benefit.

    3. Do an experiment and Count Your Chews. First of all, put a bite into your mouth, and count how many times you chew it by doing your regular way of chewing. Secondly, put another bite into your mouth, and this time count to 40 chews. I have heard anywhere from 25-50 chews, so experiment with how many you need. The food in your mouth ought to be chewed to a consistency of a paste or a liquid before swallowing.

    “How we digest food is how we digest life” Have you heard this before? I felt shocked when I read this statement. Having had my share of digestive challenges in my life, I immediately knew it was true. Helping our digestive system by slowing down and chewing thoroughly extends health and well-being to every area of our life. So let me ask you, “How are you digesting life?”

    Susan Kinross

    Certified Colon Hydrotherapist

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